Guide to the David Protess (1946- ) Papers

Collection Title: David Protess (1946- ) Papers
Dates: 1996-2001
Identification: 16/17
Creator: Protess, David
Extent: 29 Boxes
Language of Materials: English
Abstract: This series fills 29 boxes and almost exclusively contains incoming correspondence either sent directly or forwarded to Protess and relating to the cases of prisoners claiming innocence or unjust conviction. The letters span the years 1996 to 2001.
Note: Other Information:A letter marked in pencil with [u] signifies that the letter had not been opened at the time of its receipt by the Northwestern University Archives.  Protess received such a vast amount of mail that not all requests could be read let alone accommodated.It is important to note that some letters erroneously address Protess as a law professor or a lawyer.  Other letters request legal assistance; since Protess only investigated cases, he could not provide legal help.  It is also important to note that although some letters address Protess as being a part of the Center for Wrongful Convictions, his involvement in it, at least in terms of the materials found here, does not extend beyond its founding.  As previously noted, the Center for Wrongful Convictions is a component of the Northwestern School of Law’s Bluhm Legal Clinic, not a part of the Medill School of Journalism.  Though most of the letters are correctly addressed to Protess, his secretary, or the Medill School of Journalism, some are erroneously addressed to the School of Law or elsewhere.  No matter what an incoming letter may suggest, Protess’s formal academic appointment pertained to journalism and his work related to the Medill School of Journalism and/or the Innocence Project.
Acquisition Information: The University Archives acquired the contents of this series in seven accessions: #98-80, 98-124, 99-151, 00-318, 01-32, 01-71, 02-87.
Processing Information: Matthew Sudman; July-August, 2006.
Separated Materials: Approximately six linear feet of space has been gained from the volume of the accessions noted above to the volume of the processed series. Nearly all of this gain occurred by flattening correspondence and discarding accompanying envelopes. A few linear inches of extraneous materials also have been discarded.
Conditions Governing Access: The series is closed to access.
Repository: Northwestern University Archives
Deering Library, Room 110
1970 Campus Dr.
Evanston, IL, 60208-2300
URL: http://www.library.northwestern.edu/archives
Email: archives@northwestern.edu
Phone: 847-491-3354

Biographical/Historical Information

David Protess was born in Brooklyn, New York, on April 7, 1946, the son of Sidney and Beverly (Gordon) Protess. He received a B.A. degree in Political Science from Roosevelt University in 1968, an M.A. degree from the University of Chicago in the program of Community Organization in 1970, and a Ph.D. in public policy from the University of Chicago in 1974. Protess joined the faculty of Loyola University of Chicago in 1974 and served as an assistant professor of political science to 1976. He spent the next five years as the research director of Chicago's Better Government Association, a private watchdog group. Protess accepted appointment as professor in Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism in 1981. Protess taught courses relating to investigative journalism, the news media and capital punishment, legal affairs reporting, and the law and ethics of journalism. He joined Northwestern's Institute for Policy Research as a faculty fellow in 1982. Protess also became a faculty affiliate for the Joint Center for Policy Research, a dual effort between Northwestern University and the University of Chicago. Outside of his academic appointments Protess was a contributing writer and editor at Chicago Lawyer magazine from 1986 to 1990. He has worked as a consultant to Chicago television station WMAQ, served on the Human Relations Foundation of Chicago, been an advisory board member of the Chicago Reporter, and was a founder and executive board member of Chicago's Community Media Workshop.

From his youth Protess held an interest in matters of justice; particularly compelling to him were newspaper accounts of the executions of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. Later, through his investigative research and writing, Protess helped to win the release several wrongfully convicted prisoners and advocated for the release of many more. In 1990, he and fellow investigative reporter Rob Warden helped overturn the wrongful conviction of David Dowaliby for the murder of Dowaliby's child. Protess and Warden co-wrote a book about the case, Gone in the Night: The Dowaliby Family's Encounter with Murder and the Law in 1993. In 1996, it was adapted into a CBS television miniseries.

Protess gained national attention again in 1996, when he and undergraduate students in his investigative journalism class helped free the “Ford Heights Four,” four men (two of whom were on death row) wrongfully convicted in 1978 of murdering a young couple. Protess and Warden again wrote an account of the case, A Promise of Justice: The Eighteen-Year Fight to Save Four Innocent Men, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Both A Promise of Justice and Gone in the Night received Best Book Awards from Investigative Reporters and Editors, Inc., a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the quality of investigative reporting.

Protess's work merited national attention again in 1999, when he and another team of undergraduate students helped to gain the release of prisoner Anthony Porter. Porter, a sixteen-year resident of death row with an IQ well below the normal level, was two days away from his scheduled lethal injection when he earned a stay of execution, giving Protess and his students the chance to take his case. Their work helped lead to Alstory Simon's confession to the double murder, thereby exonerating Porter. The case proved highly influential in then-Illinois governor George Ryan's decision to commute the sentences of the state's 150-plus death row prisoners to life without parole. Ryan announced this decision on January 11, 2003, in a speech at the Northwestern University School of Law. The previous day, Ryan had freed death row prisoner Aaron Patterson from prison by giving him a pardon; Protess and a group of undergraduates had provided assistance in Patterson's case as well.

Coverage of Protess's efforts to free wrongfully convicted prisoners has appeared in the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Rolling Stone, Newsweek, USA Today, the front pages of the New York Times and Washington Post, and television programs such as “48 Hours,” “60 Minutes,” and “Dateline NBC.” His awards include the Charles Deering McCormick Award for Teaching Excellence, the Amoco Foundation Faculty Award in 1993, the Peter Lisagor Award for Exemplary Journalism in 1989, and the Poynter Institute for Media Studies' National Teaching Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Journalism Ethics. Other awards include the National Education Association's H. Councill Trenhold Memorial Award in 2002, the Nation Institute's Puffin/Nation Prize for Creative Citizenship in 2003, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers' Champion of Justice Award in 1996, Court TV's “Scales of Justice” award, the American Civil Liberties Union's James McGuire Award, the Newspaper Guild/Communication Workers of America's Herb Block Award, the Darrow Commemorative Committee's Clarence Darrow Award, Amnesty International's Media Spotlight Award, the World Detectives Association's Truth in Action Award, and the Southern Center for Human Rights' Service to Prisoners Award. Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley proclaimed a day in Protess's honor, and he was an ABC News “Person of the Week.” The United States Supreme Court cited his reporting of the Anthony Porter case in its Atkins v. Virginia decision that declared the execution of the mentally retarded to be unconstitutional.

In 1999, Protess co-founded the Center for Wrongful Convictions with (now former) Northwestern law professor Lawrence Marshall. The Center is a component of the School of Law's Bluhm Legal Clinic. That same year, he founded the Medill Innocence Project, an educational program in which journalism students investigate miscarriages of justice. The Medill Innocence Project is part of the National Innocence Network, a consortium of more than 20 journalism and law schools that investigate wrongful convictions.

Scope and Content

This series fills 29 boxes and almost exclusively contains incoming correspondence either sent directly or forwarded to Protess and relating to the cases of prisoners claiming innocence or unjust conviction. The letters span the years 1996 to 2001. The bulk of the letters dates from the period 1999-2000. The Northwestern University Archives acquired the series in several accessions between 1998 and 2002. Some of the accessions were received with restrictions governing their access. Whether or not materials were acquired under restriction has governed, in part, their final arrangement in this series. The letters of prisoners (or their advocates) are arranged first by location of conviction or imprisonment (Illinois and non-Illinois), then typically according to a rough chronology by year, and thereafter alphabetically by name of prisoner. Restricted items may cause a bifurcation of this scheme: a given year's letters may contain two alphabetical arrangements, one restricted and the other not. Regardless of how the letters were acquired or originally classified, all materials within the series may be used only with permission of the University Archivist. Note that distinctions of geography are made because Protess and his investigative journalism students dealt only with Illinois cases. Publicity generated by their notable successes prompted out-of-state prisoners and their advocates to seek help. Not all who wrote were afforded assistance.

The vast majority of the letters contain claims of wrongful convictions. Letters from Illinois prisoners date between 1996 and 2001 and fill nearly seven boxes. They are arranged first by year and thereafter alphabetically according to prisoner surname. Letters from advocates for Illinois prisoners date between 1996 and 2001 and fill nearly four boxes. These letters are claims of innocence made by a prisoner's family members or friends. These are arranged by year and then alphabetically according to the surname of the prisoner written about. Letters from specific Illinois prisoners and materials relating to exceptional cases fill nearly three boxes and date from 1997 to 1998. The prisoners who wrote to Protess in 1997 had files devoted solely to themselves. One of the files on prisoner Tyrone Hood includes a memo from Delores Patterson containing information relating to the Aaron Patterson and Eric Caine cases. Delores Patterson (no relation) worked on the Aaron Patterson case. The Hood files should be consulted for additional material concerning the highly notable Aaron Patterson case.

Letters from non-Illinois prisoners fill roughly nine boxes and date from 1996 to 2001. They are arranged first by year and then alphabetically according to surname of the prisoner. Letters from advocates for non-Illinois prisoners fill roughly seven boxes and date between 1996 and 2001. Theses also are arranged first by year and then alphabetically by surname of the prisoner written about.

Advocate letters with inadequate information take up less than one archive box and date from 1997 to 1998. These letters either omit the state of prisoner's incarceration or the prisoner's surname.

Letters about other cases fill nearly two archive boxes and date from 1999-2001. These cases involve either claims of innocence in civil cases or criminal investigations.

General correspondence and related material fill nearly one archive box and date from 1996 to 2001. Included are crank letters, announcements of publications, offers of assistance, offers of movie and television deals, holiday cards, fan mail, and general inquiries.

Arrangement of Materials

The letters of prisoners (or their advocates) are arranged first by location of conviction or imprisonment (Illinois and non-Illinois), then typically according to a rough chronology by year, and thereafter alphabetically by name of prisoner.

Subjects

Subjects

Judicial error--United States

Prisoners--Correspondence


Container List / Contents

  • Letters from Illinois Prisoners
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Boyd - Crawford, n.d. (ca. 1996-1998)Box 1, Folder 1
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Garcia - Ramey, n.d. (ca. 1996-1998)Box 1, Folder 2
    • Illinois prisoner mail:, 1996Box 1, Folder 3
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Anderson - Kines, 1997Box 1, Folder 4
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Lewis - Wright, 1997Box 1, Folder 5
    • Illinois prisoner mail, 1997Box 1, Folder 6
    • Illinois prisoner mail: first name Latherial, last name ?, 1997Box 1, Folder 7
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Antoine - Hernandez, 1998Box 1, Folder 8
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Hernandez cont. - Houston, 1998Box 1, Folder 9
    • Illinois prisoner mail: King - Kliner, 1998Box 2, Folder 1
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Kubat, 1998Box 2, Folder 2
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Kubat continued, 1998Box 2, Folder 3
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Kubat continued, 1998Box 2, Folder 4
    • Illinois prisoner mail: McClom - Wilson, 1998Box 2, Folder 5
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Anderson - Lindsey, 1998Box 3, Folder 1
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Lucien - Young, 1998Box 3, Folder 2
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Allgood - K. Brown, 1999Box 3, Folder 3
    • Illinois prisoner mail: S. Brown, 1999Box 3, Folder 4
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Calhoun - Leftridge, 1999Box 3, Folder 5
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Lofton - Miller, 1999Box 3, Folder 6
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Livingston, 1999Box 4, Folder 1
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Livingston, (continued), 1999Box 4, Folder 2
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Mixon - Serrano, 1999Box 4, Folder 3
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Spreitzer - Wilson, 1999Box 4, Folder 4
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Aalders - Calhoun, 2000Box 4, Folder 5
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Carter - Dykes, 2000Box 5, Folder 1
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Evans - Harris, 2000Box 5, Folder 2
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Harvey - F. Johnson, 2000Box 5, Folder 3
    • Illinois prisoner mail: G. Johnson, 2000Box 5, Folder 4
    • Illinois prisoner mail: G. Johnson continued, 2000Box 5, Folder 5.10
    • Illinois prisoner mail: X. Johnson - McCarroll, 2000Box 5, Folder 5.20
    • Illinois prisoner mail: McCoy - McNeil, 2000Box 6, Folder 1
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Merritt - Novy, 2000Box 6, Folder 2
    • Illinois prisoner mail: O'Connor - Perrian, 2000Box 6, Folder 3
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Marshall - Robinson, 2000Box 6, Folder 4
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Sanders - Trice, 2000Box 6, Folder 5
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Turner - Vonner, 2000Box 6, Folder 6
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Washington - Wilson, 2000Box 7, Folder 1
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Batchelor - Jones, 2001Box 7, Folder 2
    • Illinois prisoner mail: Kalinowski - Wilson, 2001Box 7, Folder 3
  • Advocates for Illinois Prisoners
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners, n.d. (ca. 1996-1998)Box 7, Folder 4
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners, 1996Box 7, Folder 5
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: no last name, 1996Box 7, Folder 6
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Beaman, 1997Box 7, Folder 7
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Beaman (cont), 1997Box 7, Folder 8
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Beaman (cont), 1997Box 8, Folder 1
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Beaman (cont.), 1997Box 8, Folder 2
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Ester - Galvan, 1997Box 8, Folder 3
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Heaton - Wright, 1997Box 8, Folder 4
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: no last name, 1997Box 8, Folder 5
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Galvan-Johnson, 1998Box 8, Folder 6
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Johnson (cont), 1998Box 8, Folder 7
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Lloyd - Ramey, 1998Box 9, Folder 1
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Ramey (cont.), 1998Box 9, Folder 2
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners, 1998Box 9, Folder 3
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: no last name, 1998Box 9, Folder 4
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Allgood - Calhoun, 1999Box 9, Folder 5
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Caruso - Guzman, 1999Box 9, Folder 6
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Hall - Kliner, 1999Box 9, Folder 7
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Livingston - Rice, 1999Box 10, Folder 1
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Rivera - Ward, 1999Box 10, Folder 2
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Williams - Woods, 1999Box 10, Folder 3
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: no last name, 1999Box 10, Folder 4
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Batchelor - Fort, 2000Box 10, Folder 5
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: Galvan - Thomas, 2000Box 10, Folder 6
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners: no last name, 2000Box 10, Folder 7
    • Advocates for Illinois prisoners, 2001Box 10, Folder 8
  • Exceptional Cases
    • Jerome Anderson, 1997Box 11, Folder 1
    • Jerome Anderson (continued), 1997Box 11, Folder 2
    • Jerome Anderson (continued), 1997Box 11, Folder 3
    • Robert Crosby, 1997Box 11, Folder 4
    • Robert Crosby (continued), 1997Box 11, Folder 5
    • John Kiner, 1997Box 11, Folder 6
    • Rudolph Lucien, 1997Box 11, Folder 7
    • Rudolph Lucien (continued), 1997Box 12, Folder 1
    • Grover Tate, 1997Box 12, Folder 2
    • Tyrone Hood, 1998Box 12, Folder 3
    • Tyrone Hood cont., 1998Box 12, Folder 4
    • Tyrone Hood cont., 1998Box 12, Folder 5
    • Tyrone Hood cont., 1998Box 12, Folder 6
    • Tyrone Hood cont., 1998Box 12, Folder 7
    • Tyrone Hood cont., 1998Box 13, Folder 1
    • Tyrone Hood cont., 1998Box 13, Folder 2
  • Letters from Non-Illinois Prisoners
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners:, n.d. (ca. 1996-1998)Box 13, Folder 3
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners:, 1996Box 13, Folder 4
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Barnes-Jacobs, 1997Box 13, Folder 5
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Jerido, 1997Box 13, Folder 6
    • Non-Illinois prisoners: Jerido cont.-Kennedy, 1997Box 14, Folder 1
    • Non-Illinois prisoners: Lang-Marshall, 1997Box 14, Folder 2
    • Non-Illinois prisoners: Medrano Wilson, 1997Box 14, Folder 3
    • Non-Illinois prisoners: Anditon-Moore, 1998Box 14, Folder 4
    • Non-Illinois prisoners: Nunn - Wakefield, 1998Box 14, Folder 5
    • Non-Illinois prisoners: Yarbor, 1998Box 14, Folder 6
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Anditon - Jones, 1998Box 14, Folder 7
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Kilburn - Yarbor, 1998Box 15, Folder 1
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Adams - Banks, 1999Box 15, Folder 2
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Banks (continued), 1999Box 15, Folder 3
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Barnes - Chivars, 1999Box 15, Folder 4
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Clark - Dean, 1999Box 15, Folder 5
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Dean (continued) - Dunn, 1999Box 15, Folder 6
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Edge - Emerick, 1999Box 16, Folder 1
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Eppenger - D. Hill, 1999Box 16, Folder 2
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: K. Hill - Kelly, 1999Box 16, Folder 3
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: La Gen - Lomax, 1999Box 16, Folder 4
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Lomax (cont.) - McGruderBox 16, Folder 5
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: McInnis - Montgomery, 1999Box 16, Folder 6
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Moore - Paige, 1999Box 17, Folder 1
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Payne - Ruof, 1999Box 17, Folder 2
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Sanders - Smith, 1999Box 17, Folder 3
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Smallwood - Torricellas, 1999Box 17, Folder 4
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Trueblood - A. Williams, 1999Box 17, Folder 5
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: K. Williams, 1999Box 18, Folder 1
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: R. Williams - Yvanes, 1999Box 18, Folder 2
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Acker - Anderson-El, 2000Box 18, Folder 3
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Aranda - Braxton, 2000Box 18, Folder 4
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Braxton (continued) - Collier, 2000Box 18, Folder 5
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Collier (continued) - Denson, 2000Box 18, Folder 6
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Dillard - Harmon, 2000Box 19, Folder 1
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Harris - E. Jones, 2000Box 19, Folder 2
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: R. Jones - Leone, 2000Box 19, Folder 3
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Level - Little, 2000Box 19, Folder 4
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Love, 2000Box 19, Folder 5
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Mabry - McCloud, 2000Box 19, Folder 6
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: McGahee - Montenegro, 2000Box 20, Folder 1
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Moore, 2000Box 20, Folder 2
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Moore (continued) - Ott, 2000Box 20, Folder 3
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Pandure - Quintana, 2000Box 20, Folder 4
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Reid - Samuelson, 2000Box 20, Folder 5
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Schwartz - Smith, 2000Box 20, Folder 6
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Smith (continued) - Warmus, 2000Box 21, Folder 1
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Warren - Yurko, 2000Box 21, Folder 2
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Adams - Ford, 2001Box 21, Folder 3
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Gordon - Romelus, 2001Box 21, Folder 4
    • Letters from non-Illinois prisoners: Sabree - Young, 2001Box 21, Folder 5
  • Advocates for Non-Illinois Prisoners
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners, n.d. (ca. 1996-1998)Box 21, Folder 6
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners, 1996Box 21, Folder 7
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: no last name, 1996Box 21, Folder 8
    • Non-Illinois prisoners: Barnes - Covington, 1997Box 22, Folder 1
    • Non-Illinois prisoners: Goodman - Shoemaker, 1997Box 22, Folder 2
    • Non-Illinois prisoners: no last name, 1997Box 22, Folder 3
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners, 1998Box 22, Folder 4
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Azania - Murray, 1998Box 22, Folder 5
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Rhomberg - Shafer, 1998Box 22, Folder 6
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: no last name, 1998Box 22, Folder 7
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Alexander - Buehl, 1999Box 22, Folder 8
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Burton, 1999Box 22, Folder 9
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Callaway - Gaynor, 1999Box 22, Folder 10
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Goldsmith - Gore, 1999Box 23, Folder 1
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Graham - Hagen, 1999Box 23, Folder 2
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Hammond - Jones, 1999Box 23, Folder 3
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Kelly, 1999Box 23, Folder 4
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: King - Koontz, 1999Box 23, Folder 5
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Lane - Latimore, 1999Box 23, Folder 6
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Matin - Outten, 1999Box 24, Folder 1
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Partin - Perry, 1999Box 24, Folder 2
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Phoenix, 1999Box 24, Folder 3
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Powers - Smith, 1999Box 24, Folder 4
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Soffar, 1999Box 24, Folder 5
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Soffar (continued), 1999Box 24, Folder 6
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Stanford - Webb, 1999Box 25, Folder 1
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: we Langa - Wilson, 1999Box 25, Folder 2
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: C. Williams, 1999Box 25, Folder 3
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: D. Williams - Wright, 1999Box 25, Folder 4
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: no last name, 1999Box 25, Folder 5
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Baltimore - Boyd, 2000Box 25, Folder 6
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Brown, 2000Box 25, Folder 7
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Bullock - Fernandez, 2000Box 25, Folder 8
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Floyd - Kesterson, 2000Box 26, Folder 1
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Kincy - Nelson, 2000Box 26, Folder 2
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Nesbitt - Roberts, 2000Box 26, Folder 3
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Russell - Shellito, 2000Box 26, Folder 4
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Sims - Valentine-Ford, 2000Box 26, Folder 5
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Vich - G. Williams, 2000Box 26, Folder 6
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: M. Williams - Wilson, 2000Box 27, Folder 1
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Wisely - Wong, 2000Box 27, Folder 2
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Conley - Perez, 2001Box 27, Folder 3
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: Rehberger - Wilson, 2001Box 27, Folder 4
    • Advocates for non-Illinois prisoners: no last name, 2001Box 27, Folder 5
    • Non-family advocates for multiple defendants, 1999Box 27, Folder 6
  • Advocate Letters with Inadequate Information
    • Advocate letters without state or prisoner's last name, 1997-2001Box 27, Folder 7
    • Advocate letter w/o state or prisoner's last name, n.d. (ca. 1996-1998)Box 27, Folder 8
    • Advocate letter w/o state or prisoner's last name, 1997Box 27, Folder 9
    • Advocate letters: state unknown, 1998Box 27, Folder 10
    • Advocate letter w/o state or prisoner's last name, 1998Box 27, Folder 11
  • Other Cases
    • Personal cases, non-innocence related: Arias-Quirós - Brown, 1999Box 27, Folder 12
    • Personal cases, non-innocence related: Burns, 1999Box 27, Folder 13
    • Personal cases, non-innocence related: Burns (continued), 1999Box 28, Folder 1
    • Personal cases, non-innocence related: DeVoe - Tumblin, 1999Box 28, Folder 2
    • Personal cases, non-innocence related: Ward - Windgard, 1999Box 28, Folder 3
    • Personal cases, non-innocence related: Antonowitz - Jones, 2000Box 28, Folder 4
    • Personal cases, non-innocence related: MacClendon - Raby, 2000Box 28, Folder 5
    • Request for assistance in Ill. criminal investigation, n.d. (ca. 1996-1998)Box 28, Folder 6
    • Requests for help that are not cases, 1999-2001Box 28, Folder 7
    • Cases presented without requests for investigation, 2000-2001Box 28, Folder 8
    • Requests to investigate non-personal cases, 1999-2000Box 29, Folder 1
  • General Correspondence and Related Material
    • Crank letter, 1996Box 29, Folder 2
    • Crank letters, 1999-2001Box 29, Folder 3
    • Greeting / holiday cards, 2000Box 29, Folder 4
    • Illinois prisoner's letter re: the Ford Heights Four, 1996Box 29, Folder 5
    • Illinois prisoner's request for a pen pal, 1999Box 29, Folder 6
    • Information about Charles Dent case, 2000Box 29, Folder 7
    • Letter to Chuck Norris, 2000Box 29, Folder 8
    • Letters from death penalty supporters, 2000Box 29, Folder 9
    • Letters to Jan Boudart, 1997Box 29, Folder 10
    • Offers of assistance, 2000-2001Box 29, Folder 11
    • Offers of TV/book/film deals, 1999Box 29, Folder 12
    • Press release for speaker on death penalty issues, 1999Box 29, Folder 13
    • Prisoner's offer to share essays and poetry, 1996Box 29, Folder 14
    • Publications and announcements, 2000Box 29, Folder 15
    • Questions and praise from fans, 1999-2001Box 29, Folder 16
    • Written works, 1998-2001Box 29, Folder 17