Guide to the John Tinney McCutcheon Cartoons

Collection Title: John Tinney McCutcheon Cartoons
Dates: 1895-1946
Bulk Dates: 1895-1946
Identification: Prints and Drawings Series I
Creator: McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Extent: 5 Boxes
Language of Materials: English
Abstract: John Tinney McCutcheon (1870–1949) was a cartoonist on the staff of various Chicago newspapers, the Chicago Record (1889–1901), The Chicago Record-Herald (1901–1903), and the Chicago Tribune (1903–1946). He had an international reputation for his political cartoons and was awarded the Pulitzer prize for cartoons in 1931. This collection consists of 454 original drawings of McCutcheon's cartoons created between 1895 and 1946. Subjects of the cartoons include foreign affairs, national and local political issues, journalism and the press, as well as general themes such as baseball, poverty, auto accidents, etc. National and international issues dominate after the advent of World War I.
Acquisition Information: After the death of John T. McCutcheon, Mrs. McCutcheon distributed his archive of original cartoons among three institutions, Northwestern University Library and the Medill School of Journalism, the Chicago Historical Society, and the Newberry Library. All 454 drawings which were given to Northwestern University in 1956 are now held by the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections.
Processing Information: The McCutcheon cartoons were organized in 1982 by Steven Gish and Brian Davies; the original finding aid was prepared by Brian Davies. In 2003 Jeffrey Ellis organized the undated cartoons by subjects and chronological eras, and added an inventory of them to the finding aid.
Separated Materials: Because John T. McCutcheon and Charles G. Dawes were such good friends, McCutcheon gave Dawes several original caricatures. These remain with the Charles G. Dawes archive in the McCormick Library and can be found listed in the Dawes guide. The Dawes archive also contains over two hundred letters from McCutcheon to Dawes as well as carbon copies of Dawes's letters to McCutcheon.
Conditions Governing Use: Available for research. Copyright for materials resides with John T. McCutcheon's executor. All users must comply with federal copyright regulations.
Preferred Citation: John Tinney McCutcheon Cartoons, 1895-1946, Prints and Drawings Series I, Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections, Northwestern University Library
Repository: Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections
Deering Library, Level 3
1970 Campus Drive
Evanston, IL,
URL: http://www.library.northwestern.edu/spec
Email: special.collections@northwestern.edu
Phone: 847-491-3635

Biographical/Historical Information

John Tinney McCutcheon, born May 6, 1870, in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, graduated from Purdue University in 1889 and moved to Chicago to work for the Chicago Morning News, later called the Chicago Record. While working for the successors of that paper, he covered the conflict in the Philippines and the Boer War in South Africa. He joined the staff of the Chicago Tribune in 1903, subsequently drawing editorial cartoons on a daily basis. He traveled widely, covering various political events. He served as the editorial cartoonist for the paper until 1946, receiving a Pulitzer Prize for his 1931 editorial cartoon, “A Wise Economist Asks a Question.” His cartoon entitled “Injun Summer,” first run in 1912, has been reprinted by various papers for decades. He received many honorary degrees, including a Doctor of Humaine Letters from Northwestern University in 1943. Subjects of his cartoons include foreign affairs, national and local political issues, journalism and the press, as well as general themes such as baseball, poverty, auto accidents, etc. National and international issues dominate after the advent of World War I. McCutcheon died on June 10, 1949 in Lake Forest, Illinois. Close personal friends included Vice-President of the U.S. and Chicago banker, Charles G. Dawes, and cartoonist George Ade with whom he collaborated on several volumes of caricatures.

Scope and Content

The collection of John Tinney McCutcheon Cartoons, 1895-1946 includes 454 original drawings by McCutcheon, most of which appeared on the editorial page of the Chicago Tribune. Subjects of his cartoons include foreign affairs, national and local political issues, journalism and the press, as well as general themes such as baseball, poverty, auto accidents, etc. National and international issues dominate after the advent of World War I. Published volumes held by the McCormick Library which contain McCutcheon cartoons include: War Cartoons by McCutcheon, Orr, Parrish [and] Somdal, [Chicago, c1942]; Cartoons by McCutcheon; A Selection of One Hundred Drawings, (Chicago: A.C. McClurg & Co., 1903); The Cartoons That Made Prince Henry Famous; and printed in the Chicago Record-Herald, (Chicago, 1902?). See the Northwestern University Library online catalog for other books with McCutcheon illustrations, including those which were collaborations with George Ade.

Arrangement of Materials

Dated materials have been arranged chronologically. The undated cartoons are arranged according to subjects and chronological eras

Inventory:

Years,                          Box,                          Count,

1895-1915,                    1,                              70

1916-1925,                    2,                              64

1926-1932,                    3,                              92

1933-1946,                    4,                              118

Uncatalogued,              5,                                59

Untitled                        5                                51

Subjects

Personal Name

McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949

Subjects

American wit and humor, Pictorial

Caricatures and cartoons


Container List / Contents

  • McCutcheon Political Cartoons, 1895-1946
    • A good joke–Chauncey Defew says he is through with politics., 1902 April 13Box 1
    • The forty-sixth visit, 1905 Feb 7Box 1
    • “Beware of a light man! He's an expert”., 1905 Oct 6Box 1
    • Father Time's merry-go-round, 1905 Nov 9Box 1
    • How can Chicago raise $375,000 for five hundred additional policemen?, 1906 Jan 19Box 1
    • His masters voice, 1906 Feb 28Box 1
    • The hen is being proposed as a better national emblem than the eagle., 1906 April 28Box 1
    • The present she liked most, 1906 Dec 26Box 1
    • Proposed line of march for –(subject to change)., 1907 Jan 1, 1907Box 1
    • Wanted–a mirror with each theater seat, 1907 Feb 28Box 1
    • Mayor Dunne–“Oh, look, Miss Chicago! Here are some nice gentlemen who have come all the way from New York to help you clean house”., 1907 March 29Box 1
    • Mr. Roosevelt's plans for quiet retirement (according to the dispatches)., 1908 Nov 7Box 1
    • Will he see his shadow?, 1909 Feb 2Box 1
    • A discordant note, 1909 Feb 9Box 1
    • Senatorial race, 1909 April 1Box 1
    • What would you think of a man who would do this?, 1909 April 6Box 1
    • Will the Illinois Legislature ever agree upon anything?, 1909 May 25Box 1
    • Senate is going to hold night sessions., 1909 June 3Box 1
    • They forgot to remove the cost mark., 1910 May 7Box 1
    • When Lorimer visits the White House, 1910 May 12Box 1
    • Unter den Linden, 1910 May 13Box 1
    • Suggestion for statue in the hall of Illinois fame., 1910 May 14Box 1
    • His explanation, 1910 May 31Box 1
    • Two sides of the picture, 1910 June 8Box 1
    • Senator Lorimer–“That helps some, and if it wasn't for four or five other things, I'd feel pretty good”., 1910 Sept 10Box 1
    • Will Mr. Lorimer go down to LaSalle County and work as hard for Brown's election as Brown worked for Lorimer's election at Springfield?, 1910 Sept 12Box 1
    • Mr. voter, you're on the jury today. The case is “Illinois versus corruption”. Let's see what sort of jurymen you make., 1910 Sept 15Box 1
    • Thought program for the week, 1910 Oct 18Box 1
    • How long will the other tenants stand for it?, 1910 Oct 31Box 1
    • Cheer up! These patriots, all members of the managing committee of the Cook County Democrazy, will save you., 1910 Nov 2Box 1
    • Waiting for Santa, 1910 Dec 26Box 1
    • Riddling the support, 1911 Jan 11Box 1
    • How to start a war, 1911 March 16Box 1
    • Friday the 13th, pro and con, 1911 Oct 13Box 1
    • The Lorimer witness who could explain everything except one thing., 1911 Nov 11Box 1
    • Mr. LaFollette's strongest card, 1911 Dec 29Box 1
    • A little of this–would prevent an awful lot of this., 1912 May 21Box 1
    • Favorite legal tactics of crafty counsel, 1912 May 26Box 1
    • The Trust press, 1912 July 12Box 1
    • The rival houses, 1912 Aug 19Box 1
    • Senator Penrose–“That? Why, that was only a campaign contribution”., 1912 Aug 22Box 1
    • A Bull Moose family, 1912 Oct 13Box 1
    • Governor Wilson's trust record, 1912 Oct 14Box 1
    • If Wilson is elected, 1912 Nov 2Box 1
    • U.P. and S.P. railroads to be unscrambled, 1912 Dec 3Box 1
    • Governor Wilson gives warning to panic breeders., 1912 Dec 19Box 1
    • Governor Wilson speaks tonight., 1913 Jan 11Box 1
    • Winter's no time to invite a man to join a golf club., 1913 Feb 28Box 1
    • Chantecler, 1913 March 4Box 1
    • Congress may go on an unsympathetic strike., 1913 June 24Box 1
    • Waiting for the governor's signature, 1913 June 25Box 1
    • The President is enjoying golf these days., 1913 July 11Box 1
    • July 14th, 1913 July 14Box 1
    • Harold's photographic record of his summer vacation, 1913 July 28Box 1
    • Of course Woodrow was willing, 1913 Sept 27Box 1
    • There's sure to be ire in Ireland, either way it goes., 1913 Sept 29Box 1
    • Grim lessons of the sea, 1913 Oct 15Box 1
    • A good little umbrella as long as we have fair weather., 1914 Nov 21Box 1
    • The spirit of the private soldier, 1914 Dec 7Box 1
    • Some points in the President's message, 1914 Dec 9Box 1
    • The Kaiser's B-day, 1915 Jan 27Box 1
    • That senate revolt imperils the shipping bill, 1915 Feb 3Box 1
    • Useless to argue with drunken men, 1915 Feb 19Box 1
    • Getting hardened to horror, 1915 March 1Box 1
    • This is no time for jingo-ism., 1915 May 13Box 1
    • While the world waits, 1915 May 15Box 1
    • Her spokesman, 1915 June 3Box 1
    • Both for Peace, but by different routes, 1915 June 12Box 1
    • Which will it be?, 1915 June 18Box 1
    • The “lock-in” as a remedy for the “lock-out”., 1915 July 1Box 1
    • When history shudders, 1916 March 1Box 2
    • An intermission–not intervention, 1916 March 14Box 2
    • Preparedness with a vengeance!, 1916 March 15Box 2
    • Watchful waiting until their ammunition arrives, 1916 March 24Box 2
    • How Woodrow can circumvent Theodore., 1916 April 8Box 2
    • Alas, poor Villa! Dead again., 1916 April 18Box 2
    • The President reads the colonel's speech., 1916 May 1Box 2
    • History repeats itself., 1916 May 11Box 2
    • , or Watchful waiting. It all depends upon where you do your waiting., 1916 May 26, July 20Box 2
    • The President might try the “lock-in” method of settling the controversy., 1916 Aug 15Box 2
    • The first rule of the game, 1916 Aug 28Box 2
    • Blood transfusion prosperity, 1916 Nov 2Box 2
    • The spirit of the times is not spirituous., 1916 Nov 20Box 2
    • President Wilson at least makes a hit with a lot of the suffering small nations., 1916 Dec 22Box 2
    • By-products of peace, 1916 Dec 28Box 2
    • How to make the draft a success., 1917 July 1Box 2
    • An awkward interruption for independence day, 1917 July 4Box 2
    • How long would an American-German newspaper last in Berlin?, 1917 July 24Box 2
    • Our first four months at war, 1917 Aug 6Box 2
    • Kaiser at the bat, 1917 Oct 6Box 2
    • Our debt to Russia, 1917 Nov 3Box 2
    • Woman suffrage will counteract Tammany., 1917 Nov 8Box 2
    • United action under one head would crush him., 1917 Nov 14Box 2
    • Suggestion for a monument in front of the War Department., 1917 Dec 27Box 2
    • Trotzky, 1918 Jan 13Box 2
    • The black hand, 1918 Jan 19Box 2
    • The busy bolshevik, 1918 Jan 30Box 2
    • “Volunteer or–be drafted”., 1918 Feb 3Box 2
    • Only a matter of time and careful playing, 1918 Aug 12Box 2
    • Billion dollar business should have a budget system., 1918 Aug 15Box 2
    • Mayor Thompson's war record no. 2: His opposition to the draft., 1918 Sept 4Box 2
    • Mayor Thompson's war record no. 3: “The Republican”., 1918 Sept 5Box 2
    • How the Democrats support the President., 1918 Oct 3Box 2
    • What your vote can do in November., 1918 Oct 20Box 2
    • President's appeal, 1918 Oct 31Box 2
    • The President's fourteen points, 1919 March 18Box 2
    • Conflicting reports from the Peace Conference, 1919 April 9Box 2
    • The embarrassment of arranging a match before getting the consent of the bridegroom., 1919 June 13Box 2
    • Competition, 1919 July 5Box 2
    • The President returns., 1919 July 9Box 2
    • Now is the time to study it., 1919 July 12Box 2
    • The “Contemptibles”., 1919 Sept 11Box 2
    • Again dead, 1919 Oct 10Box 2
    • Will the President be as successful in–, 1919 Nov 8Box 2
    • The President and the senate, 1920 March 10Box 2
    • While the taxi waits, 1920 April 10Box 2
    • The question of the hour, 1920 July 3Box 2
    • Will Illinois do it?, 1920 Sept 14Box 2
    • She's “been kidded by experts”., 1920 Oct 27Box 2
    • , or Capital and labor, 1920 Nov 18, Nov 26Box 2
    • A chance for the President to invest his Nobel Peace Prize money., 1920 Dec 8Box 2
    • Reinforcements, 1921 June 7Box 2
    • Address to the graduating class, 1921 June 16Box 2
    • Not popular in America, 1921 Sept 20Box 2
    • The ramifications of city hall policies, 1922 Sept 29Box 2
    • Another war baby, 1923 Oct 23Box 2
    • As she looks for her standard bearer, 1924 June 2Box 2
    • As the nominee eventually will be chosen, 1924 July 3Box 2
    • The pipe of Peace, 1924 July 16Box 2
    • He can't do both., 1924 July 29Box 2
    • The battle of the alienists, 1924 Aug 14Box 2
    • Some testimonials to a great American, 1924 Oct 11Box 2
    • The romance of city real estate, 1925 Aug 14Box 2
    • So say we all of us, 1925 Oct 6Box 2
    • The poor relation, 1926 Jan 3Box 3
    • Mr. Brennan lends a helping hand., 1926 April 24Box 3
    • She is up against a hard game., 1926 May 22Box 3
    • Flag Day, 1926 June 14Box 3
    • Give the people what they want., 1926 July 8Box 3
    • Our local register, 1926 July 14Box 3
    • When governor Al visits President Cal, 1926 July 20Box 3
    • Hew to the line, let the chips fall where they may., 1926 July 28Box 3
    • The city man who has to do his motoring on Sunday., 1926 Aug 30Box 3
    • A big diplomatic game, 1926 Sept 12Box 3
    • The unbeliever, 1926 Sept 15Box 3
    • Back to normalcy, 1926 Nov 5Box 3
    • Mussolini's place in the sun, 1926 Nov 17Box 3
    • “We've got our horn, Bill. Now, give us something to blow about”., 1927 April 7Box 3
    • A trespasser that must be put under bonds., 1927 June 3Box 3
    • What the Lindenburg and Chamberlain flights have done, 1927 June 7Box 3
    • A fair proposal, with an alternative, 1927 June 21Box 3
    • Alimony, 1927 June 27Box 3
    • This result would satisfy those who object to Dempsey's appearance in a war memorial., 1927 July 27Box 3
    • Why Presidents don't choose to run., 1927 Aug 26Box 3
    • When Big Bill propoganda meets British propoganda, 1927 Sept 1Box 3
    • When parents should begin to take an interest in the public schools, 1927 Sept 6Box 3
    • Whenever he wants to try, the weather can completely dominate our thoughts., 1927 Sept 14Box 3
    • The old game of drop the handkerchief, 1927 Sept 17Box 3
    • The spotlight shifts from Tennessee to Chicago., 1927 Oct 25Box 3
    • Woman and children first, 1927 Nov 2Box 3
    • In the days of faked animal films, 1927 Nov 5Box 3
    • The new Ford car to the rescue!, 1927 Dec 3Box 3
    • As the G.O.P. considers a nominee, 1927 Dec 13Box 3
    • Sanity is a grand old man., 1927 Dec 20Box 3
    • The snipers, 1928 Jan 5Box 3
    • The great uprising, 1928 April 12Box 3
    • This will make the race more interesting to watch., 1928 May 10Box 3
    • It's only the patch that he is spanking., 1928 May 24Box 3
    • When secretary Mellon arrives in Kansas City, 1928 June 9Box 3
    • Wavering allegiance, 1928 July 13Box 3
    • As Secretary Kellogg starts to Paris to sign the treaty, 1928 Aug 15Box 3
    • Humors of the campaign: Mr. Raskob's trying to prove Republican prosperity a myth., 1928 Sept 4Box 3
    • A world's exposition in 1933 will compel Chicago to complete a lot of much needed improvements before that time., 1928 Nov 22Box 3
    • Daily demonstrations that there is an alliance between Crime and Politics., 1928 Nov 30Box 3
    • Big events, 1928 Dec 2Box 3
    • The haunted house, 1929 May 16Box 3
    • Are dreams actually beginning to come true?, 1929 May 31Box 3
    • When Hoover applies his naval “yardstick”, 1929 June 8Box 3
    • How to curb the American society woman's mad craving to be presented at court., 1929 June 18Box 3
    • It begins to look as though we might have a subway to show the World's Fair visitors., 1929 June 21Box 3
    • When the Kaiser goes back to Germany, 1929 June 29Box 3
    • He has the advantage of not being allowed to spend his money., 1929 July 17Box 3
    • The diplomaniacs, 1929 Aug 23Box 3
    • How to win approval of the worst elements in the city., 1929 Nov 5Box 3
    • Calmer seas ahead, 1930 Jan 2Box 3
    • Their reputations at stake, 1930 April 21Box 3
    • Political fences and national defenses, 1930 May 31Box 3
    • A June bride, 1930 June 3Box 3
    • The challenge, 1930 June 11Box 3
    • Gangland's declaration of independence, 1930 July 4Box 3
    • A tragedy of the corn belt, 1930 July 22Box 3
    • Necessary accomplishments if he wants to impress his visitors, 1930 Aug 9Box 3
    • When one side is down, the other is up., 1930 Aug 10Box 3
    • Can the President's ability overcome his bad luck?, 1930 Aug 14Box 3
    • At last a breach in the walls; or, Consternation in Gangland., 1930 Aug 18Box 3
    • No respecter of places, 1930 Sept 5Box 3
    • The nightmare of business and labor, 1930 Sept 11Box 3
    • Have the citizens of Chicago at last awakened?, 1930 Sept 15Box 3
    • If he means business, he will begin at the top., 1930 Oct 3Box 3
    • A warning to those who profit by aggravating the nation's economic distress, 1930 Oct 9Box 3
    • How the unemployment relief fund got a nice, fat subscription., 1930 Nov 18Box 3
    • The Democratic entry is off to a harmonious start., 1930 Dec 29Box 3
    • Some valentines, 1931 Feb 14Box 3
    • When judge Lyle first began the study of law–, 1931 Feb 18Box 3
    • If Big Bill is our world's fair mayor and receives the distinguished foreign guests, 1931 Feb 20Box 3
    • They get lazy if they've been in office two or three terms., 1931 Feb 23Box 3
    • Big Bill tries writing his own obituary., 1931 March 30Box 3
    • Chicago's hero of the ballot box recommends the hero of next Tuesday's ballot box., 1931 April 3, 1930Box 3
    • Why the public's verdict and the jury's verdict often differ., 1931 June 2Box 3
    • The watch dog is not to be muzzled., 1931 June 3Box 3
    • When the conference convenes, 1931 June 14Box 3
    • The doctor calls, 1931 June 16Box 3
    • Today is the twenty first of June. The longest day of the year–., 1931 June 21Box 3
    • A slight rearrangement will be necessary., 1931 June 27Box 3
    • A consultation of the family physicians, 1931 July 1Box 3
    • American tourist money in Europe, 1931 July 22Box 3
    • A wise economist asks a question [Pulitzer Prize Cartoon; a copy]., 1931 Aug 19Box 3
    • The dangerous short-cut, 1931 Sept 4Box 3
    • Will the steel cut help or retard recovery?, 1931 Sept 24Box 3
    • Would the stock exchange prefer to regulate him, or wait for congress to do it?, 1931 Sept 28Box 3
    • Have we learned anything from our '29 experience?, 1931 Oct 3Box 3
    • Starting the flow, 1931 Oct 8Box 3
    • What they'll be talking about in, 1931 Oct 16, 1952Box 3
    • An encouraging sign of recovery, 1931 Nov 3Box 3
    • It's a pleasant change to have the country looking at some other city's dirty linen., 1931 Nov 4Box 3
    • “Twas the week before Christmas, and all through the House–”, 1931 Dec 17Box 3
    • Circus midget sits on knee of J.P. Morgan in Senate Committee room, 1933 June 3Box 4
    • Speculation highway, 1933 July 23Box 4
    • Don't lock your hearts till the chest is filled., 1933 Nov 16Box 4
    • Some of the high spots in the President's message, 1934 Jan 4Box 4
    • At last the monetary policy is revealed., 1934 Jan 16Box 4
    • The changing world, 1934 Jan 18Box 4
    • If the Republicans nominated Teddy Roosevelt to run against Franklin Roosevelt, 1934 April 19Box 4
    • All quiet on the Potomac, 1934 July 1Box 4
    • The most important work of a world's fair President is being an ambassador of good will., 1934 July 22Box 4
    • There's been an awful lot of war talk since the natives renounced war., 1934 Aug 5Box 4
    • Cartoons of the day, 1934 Aug 23Box 4
    • The world's greatest radio salesman, 1934 Aug 26Box 4
    • More proof that a House cleaning is needed., 1934 Sept 6Box 4
    • Will either back-seat driver prevail?, 1934 Nov 13Box 4
    • French opinion seems divided., 1934 Nov 22Box 4
    • The new road map for 1935, 1935 Jan 8Box 4
    • The sarcastic husband. The inventor of mental cruelty., 1935 March 10Box 4
    • A mandatory prison sentence for hit-and-run drivers, 1935 March 31Box 4
    • Another public enemy–the non-signaller, 1935 April 21Box 4
    • Just one explosion after another, 1935 May 28Box 4
    • Cartoons of the day, 1935 June 4Box 4
    • The right and wrong way, 1935 Sept 10Box 4
    • Constitution Day in Italy, 1935 Sept 17Box 4
    • Slavery in Ethiopia, 1935 Sept 29Box 4
    • Mussolini's fine Italian hand, 1935 Oct 10Box 4
    • Which will win?, 1935 Dec 5Box 4
    • The Black Legion, 1936 May 28Box 4
    • “Gosh! How my ears burn!”, 1936 June 11Box 4
    • Advisory committee waiting for the veteran with his bonus check, 1936 June 14Box 4
    • The danger of over confidence, 1936 July 16Box 4
    • A Leap Year proposal, 1936 July 23Box 4
    • The rival campaign artists, 1936 July 26Box 4
    • Agriculture then and now, 1936 Sept 24Box 4
    • Another one of war's bad habits, 1936 Sept 27Box 4
    • Will the Windsor-Simpson romance go ringing down the ages?, 1936 Dec 13Box 4
    • The economic principle that shocked the old timers when they first heard of it, 1937 March 21Box 4
    • Reversing natural laws, 1937 April 20Box 4
    • Some healthy comments that will follow if he passes the Driver's License Bill, 1937 June 29Box 4
    • Cupid makes a June record, 1937 July 1Box 4
    • The Republican Senators are enjoying the summer in Washington., 1937 July 20Box 4
    • Texas Jack to the rescue, 1937 July 27Box 4
    • The President begins his political pulse feeling tour., 1937 Sept 23Box 4
    • The cause of the stock slump by experts, 1937 Oct 21Box 4
    • The posed photograph versus the candid camera, 1938 March 27Box 4
    • The week beginning July 24 is to be Courtesy Week. (Folks are requested to practice for it.), 1938 July 21Box 4
    • The changing world, 1938 Aug 4Box 4
    • Are Mr. Chamberlan's peace efforts a stimulant for the dictators to quit their warlike plans or to hurry them?, 1938 Aug 25Box 4
    • The birth of a nation, 1938 Sept 11Box 4
    • She gets a last minute reprieve., 1938 Sept 13Box 4
    • If we are saved from war, it will be due to Chamberlain's unheroic, thankless courage that we owe it., 1938 Sept 22Box 4
    • He nearly casts the fateful die., 1938 Sept 27Box 4
    • Here are some helpful suggestions if Europe is not yet purged of its war psychosis; or, A suggestion for clearing the atmosphere in Europe., 1938 Oct 2Box 4
    • When the cub fans want to know why the cubs are sure to win, 1938 Oct 6Box 4
    • Navy Day, 1938 Oct 27Box 4
    • The battle of the air waves, 1938 Nov 6Box 4
    • The Nazi bill collector's methods are stirring up some dangerous echoes., 1938 Nov 15Box 4
    • Cross-examining junior about his travels, 1938 Dec 4Box 4
    • Poor girl! She gets a salary of only a few hundred thousand a year, so she has to rob her Santy Claus., 1938 Dec 15Box 4
    • One of the ironic features of a war between dictatorships is–, 1939 Jan 10Box 4
    • In the footsteps of Washington, 1939 Jan 31Box 4
    • What we may be headed for if we don't look out, 1939 April 27Box 4
    • Will it be a battle of the nerves or a battle royal?, 1939 May 2Box 4
    • They always love an American spender and lender., 1939 Aug 3Box 4
    • Where all the trouble started, 1939 Aug 27Box 4
    • America during the world war and now; or, The U.S. during the world war and now., 1939 Oct 10Box 4
    • Will the President declare his intentions at tomorrow's Jackson Day dinner?, 1940 Jan 7, 1940Box 4
    • We hope his dangerous foreign policy isn't planned that way., 1940 April 21Box 4
    • A presidential poll on the third term, 1940 July 23Box 4
    • The versatile Democratic Party slogans, 1940 Aug 8Box 4
    • Now they have both accepted, 1940 Aug 18Box 4
    • The memory of Woodrow Wilson has made them skeptical of pledges., 1940 Oct 13Box 4
    • The Roosevelt Doctrine, our most foreign policy, is designed to get us into more trouble than the two others can get us out of; or, The Roosevelt Doctrine nullifies both the Washington and Monroe Doctrines., 1940 Oct 27Box 4
    • Some Armistice Day observations, 1940 Nov 12Box 4
    • The nation is not all taking your warward step, Mr. President., 1940 Dec 31Box 4
    • Encroachments of the Executive upon the Judicial and the Legislative., 1941 Jan 28Box 4
    • The will o' the wisp of world peace, 1941 Feb 2Box 4
    • The after effect of war-making on the Democratic Party, 1941 Feb 18Box 4
    • Some day there will be another election., 1941 Feb 23Box 4
    • And now we are only one warward step short of war., 1941 May 29Box 4
    • Whither are we drifting?, 1941 June 19Box 4
    • One headache after another, 1941 June 26Box 4
    • Why America is not stampeded into war by high-sounding slogans., 1941 July 8Box 4
    • The memory of Woodrow Wilson has made Americans skeptical of promises., 1941 July 22Box 4
    • The war mongers who are trying to get the rest of the nation into a European war, 1941 July 24Box 4
    • The President quotes Lincoln and draws a parallel. —Where is the parallel?, 1941 Aug 21Box 4
    • It will soon be hard for the arsenal to tell the good aggressor from the bad aggressor., 1941 Aug 28Box 4
    • The U.S.A. as seen from the east and from the west of the Hudson., 1941 Sept 7Box 4
    • The Democratic party's road to European war, 1941 Sept 21Box 4
    • The four horsemen, 1941 Sept 23Box 4
    • Would Congress ever declare war on those fourteen points?, 1941 Sept 25Box 4
    • How long will the American ballott box prevail?, 1941 Sept 30Box 4
    • The way not to keep out of war, 1941 Nov 16Box 4
    • A year of fortitude—intestinal and otherwise., 1941 Dec 28Box 4
    • Don't underestimate our enemy and–don't let our enemy underestimate us., 1942 Feb 3Box 4
    • The President refers to map in war speech., 1942 Feb 25Box 4
    • “Whee! Now MacArthur is in charge!”, 1942 March 18Box 4
    • See “birth rate” in America and “death rate” in Europe., 1942 May 24Box 4
    • The inquiring reporter: The second front as seen from afar., 1942 July 12Box 4
    • The old stand-by shows signs of getting out of line., 1943 March 7Box 4
    • Will history call it the “Battle of the soft under belly of Europe”?, 1943 May 12Box 4
    • As the mighty forces plan their campaigns, 1943 May 14Box 4
    • Quarantining seems to be coming in use again., 1943 May 21Box 4
    • The straws show which way the wind is blowing, as viewed from the Wilhelmstrasse., 1943 June 11Box 4
    • All is not quiet on the home front., 1943 July 2Box 4
    • Since Italy stubbed its toe and fell out of the goose step, there has been a pronounced rustle of peace wings from Russia to Rome., 1943 July 28Box 4
    • Maybe Stalin doesn't want his hands tied by an “unconditional surrender” policy that includes Japan., 1943 Aug 25Box 4
    • My gosh! Are they thinking of a fifth term?!!?, 1943 Sept 8Box 4
    • Will history repeat itself?, 1943 Sept 29Box 4
    • Fortune has a tricky way of showering her favors upon those she loves—and then withholding the one thing they most desire., 1943 Dec 15Box 4
    • Fortune has a tricky way of granting her favorites every wish but one., 1944 Aug 20Box 4
    • Politics; or, Waiting for justice., 1944 Sept 10Box 4
    • Something for fathers and mothers to think about, 1944 Oct 8Box 4
    • War is helpful!!?, 1944 Oct 15Box 4
    • A great mystery, 1944 Oct 22Box 4
    • As the other thirty Presidents would vote, 1944 Oct 29Box 4
    • The training school for Presidents, 1944 Nov 5Box 4
    • If only human nature could be permanently revised, 1945 April 29Box 4
  • Uncatalogued Cartoons
    • Crime and CorruptionBox 5
      • “A Thriving Industry.” 6 panels showing a policeman giving a tour of corruption in Chicago, September 7, 19--Box 5, Item 1
      • “The County Jail as Sheriff Strassheim Runs It.”Box 5, Item 2
      • Three panels: 1-“Mr. Morgan Testifies” 2-“The Chicago hold-up men and auto-bandits are trying to form a ‘money trust.’” 3-“Dec. 21 - the shortest day of the year.” - December 19--Box 5, Item 3
      • Three panels, : 1-“Odd music for a wedding march”—“Baldwin” and “Canterbury” play “Hymn of Death” 2-Supreme Court: “Who will be given the vacant chair?” 3-“The crime annals become very depressing at times.”, 1937Box 5, Item 4
      • “Gosh, I wish we could get on the track of this crime ring.”Box 5, Item 5
      • No caption: information for pedestrians and drivers, “Don't run away after striking a pedestrian” highlightedBox 5, Item 6
      • No caption: “Justice” and “Constable” are robbing a “Defendant”Box 5, Item 7
      • No caption: “Justice” female being run down by “Corruption and Graft” automobile, “The Law” says, “Hi hum.” (Illinois crime)Box 5, Item 8
      • “For the sake of our children, we've got to clean up this town.”, 1927?Box 5, Item 9
    • Prohibition/AlcoholBox 5
      • No caption: man drinking “Moonshine” becomes gun-toting animalBox 5, Item 1
      • “Today the News runs to R's. When will it run to Peace?” (man reads paper with bad news; prohibition era)Box 5, Item 2
      • “The new Juggernaut.” “The Water Wagon” drives through town, crushing “Saloons”Box 5, Item 3
      • “The Saloonman's Dream of an Ideal City Council”Box 5, Item 4
    • Depression EraBox 5
      • Three panels, : 1-“Big Bill admires an ancient author.” 2-“A dark outlook for congressional ‘lame ducks.’” 3-“The invalid [Stock Market] seems to be perking up.”, 1931Box 5, Item 1
      • “Blood transfusion after other doctors and other treatments have failed.” “The U.S.A.” patient and “Dr. Roosevelt” at the “National Recovery Hospital.”Box 5, Item 2
      • “The Stadium Unemployment Relief Game. [1] Under ordinary circumstances The Big Ten would be justified in strictly adhering to their rule— [2] but the present circumstances are exceptional, and exceptional circumstances justify exceptional measures. No one would suffer by the waiving of a technical rule and many thousands of unfortunates would benefit.” (Depression, October 28, 1930), October 28, 1930Box 5, Item 3
    • HolidaysBox 5
      • “Memorial Day at the Tomb.” Tomb decorated with “Vaudeville” and “Matinee” signsBox 5, Item 1
      • No caption: “Labor Day,” man with “Vote” plays “Organ-ization,” which makes “Bank Notes,” and “Politician” and “Vote Hunter” are happy (Labor Day?)Box 5, Item 2
      • “The Prospects for 1924—What a happy world it would be if everybody really tried to make it happier!” (New Year ), 1924Box 5, Item 3
      • No caption: people celebrating the Fourth of JulyBox 5, Item 4
      • No caption: start of school year, apple season, people back from vacation (Labor Day)Box 5, Item 5
    • Labor and Wealth IssuesBox 5
      • Three panels: 1-“The great legal battle between the government and the packers begins.” 2-“Jerome brings the charter member [Ryan] of the ‘Won't Tell Club’ to time.” 3-“The wise men [Dunne and charter convention] gather to consider the needs of Chicago.”Box 5, Item 1
      • “A Problem for some of the Bright Presidential Candidates: How to raise wages without raising the Cost of Living and Reducing Production.”Box 5, Item 2
      • “Next on the Waiting List of The Roosevelt Club.” “Over Capitalization” is next target.Box 5, Item 3
      • “Is a ‘Firemen's Union’ a good thing?”Box 5, Item 4
      • “Who will get hurt?” Uncle Sam-type character lights “Indictment” fuse between “Labor Leaders” and “Packers” (Labor, 1916–1918?)Box 5, Item 5
      • “Carnegie Solves the Labor Problem.”Box 5, Item 6
      • "'A Five Day Week for Workers' - Henry Ford"Box 5, Item 7
    • Mexican Affairs/Civil WarBox 5
      • Three panels: Wilson dealing with 1-Europe, 2-Peace, 3-MexicoBox 5, Item 1
      • Three panels: 1-Wilson/McAdoo, 2-Greece, 3-Cuba/Mexico, 1924?Box 5, Item 2
      • “You must salute that flag!” (Mexico, 1919/1924?)Box 5, Item 3
      • “We wish the U.S. could - [1] end a war as easily - [2] as Mexico can start one.” (Wilson era)Box 5, Item 4
      • “If Huerta Resigns to Run for the Presidency.” (Mexican politics)Box 5, Item 5
      • “Just before Vera Cruz fell.” (Wilson and Mexican War)Box 5, Item 6
      • “In the Senate; a Politician first, a Patriot second.” (Wilson and Mexican War)Box 5, Item 7
    • World War One: before American InterventionBox 5
      • No caption: Wilson waiting to give signal to let loose “Dogs of War”Box 5, Item 1
      • Three panels: 1-Alaska Coast and Inland R.R., 2-Roger Sullivan & Peace, 3-Wilson and Senators versus Opposition (after 1916?)Box 5, Item 2
      • “Watchful Waiting.” “Doctor Wilson” watches “Peace” bird get attacked over “Europe” houseBox 5, Item 3
      • “Will Uncle Sam's Honor and Dignity Demand that he Plunge In?” (pertaining to “German Submarine Attacks”)Box 5, Item 4
      • “What! Another secret understanding?” Wilson plays cards with European countries with lots of “Secret Treaties”Box 5, Item 5
      • “The Crime of the Ages. Who did it?” European countries blame one another as “The Peace of Europe” lies dead in the backgroundBox 5, Item 6
      • “The People across the Way.” “Wilson” observes European neighbors fighting from across the streetBox 5, Item 7
    • Midst of World War IBox 5
      • Three panels: 1-“Next!”—“Lloyd George” takes on “Maurice Crisis” and “Irish Crisis” 2-“The peace offer.”—octopus (Germany?) holds other countries in tentacles 3-“Prepare to meet the distinguished foreigner, Monsieur Thrift.”Box 5, Item 1
      • Three panels: 1-“The President [Wilson] cuts the Gordian Knot.” 2-“Will he [Kerensky] be a Napoleon, a Cromwell, or a Washington.” 3-“It [$5,000,000,000 war appropriation] will cost a lot more if we lose.”Box 5, Item 2
      • No caption: “Franco American Relations,” America attacked by “Clemenceau” tigerBox 5, Item 3
      • Three panels: 1-Foreign responses to Minsk Peace Conference, 2-Ex-White Hopes, 3-Wilson/T.R., ProgressivesBox 5, Item 4
      • “To the Men of America!” (large billboard with slogans)Box 5, Item 5
      • “A United Front; Behind the Army and Navy, the President [Wilson], behind the President, the Congress, behind the Congress, the People, and behind the People, the history of a nation that will not allow its flag to be insulted.”Box 5, Item 6
    • Treaties and Aftermath of World War IBox 5
      • Three panels: 1-Wilson watering “Peace Seed”—“Will he succeed?” 2-“On the Ship of State” 3-“The three American types.”Box 5, Item 1
      • “I don't believe I can work it twice.” (Wilson and elections)Box 5, Item 2
      • Four panels: Soldiers, “Help decorate their graves.” (Memorial Day?)Box 5, Item 3
      • No caption: Mussolini cat has eaten League of Nations bird (world politics, post-WWI/pre-WWII)Box 5, Item 4
      • “America's War Ideals”, December 21, 1926Box 5, Item 5
      • Locarno Treaty, Dawes Plan, War Hatreds, Versailles Treaty”, 1925?Box 5, Item 6
      • No caption: Uncle Sam-character holds “National Defenses” gun, “U.S.A. Possessions” are stored nearby (post-WWI)Box 5, Item 7
      • “What the war has done to the Hall of Fame.” (destroyed busts of famous military people)Box 5, Item 8
      • “The High Water Mark of the German Waves.”, 1920?Box 5, Item 9
      • “The World's Greatest Santa Claus.” Hoover delivers “Nine Hundred Million Dollars” to European housesBox 5, Item 10
      • “Peace Terms. 1-When Germany has a winning streak. 2-When Germany has a losing streak.”Box 5, Item 11
      • “The Treaty Makers.” “Wilson” joins disheartened European leadersBox 5, Item 12
      • “The Stage is Set for the Last Act.” Leaders force feed someone the “Peace Pill”Box 5, Item 13
    • Miscellaneous World EventsBox 5
      • “American Tourists in Europe”Box 5, Item 1
      • “It May Prevent Marching.” “Earthquake wounds” bandage wrapped around ItalyBox 5, Item 2
      • “The desirability of a trade.” U.S. and Canada swap clothesBox 5, Item 3
      • “The Czar - ‘I wonder if you are going to turn traitor too.’ (Russia has always considered the months of January and February to be its two greatest generals.)”Box 5, Item 4
      • “Vienna Populace Celebrating the ‘Great Victories’ in Italy.”Box 5, Item 5
    • National PoliticsBox 5
      • “The Ones he Exhibits.” “W. W.”shows off “Prosperity” and “Peace,” his two “Masterpieces.”, 1917?Box 5, Item 1
      • “Please, Mr. Aldrich, trim this load down a bit.” Elephant is bogged down by “Taxes.”Box 5, Item 2
      • “Ballinger is to be whitewashed. Great Scott, it will take a lot! And we tax payers will probably have to pay for it.”Box 5, Item 3
      • “The Political Orator.” (he is about to sit on a pin)(politics, 1934)Box 5, Item 4
      • “Gosh! If us statesmen could draw crowds like that!” (1926)Box 5, Item 5
      • “Do you think he will like it?” (national politics and taxes)Box 5, Item 6
      • Six panels: Pendalum swinging in six panels with regard to political issues (national and world politics, 1920 or later)Box 5, Item 7
      • “1=6 Q.E.D.” (Wilson)Box 5, Item 8
      • Three panels: 1-“Chicago loses its foremost citizen [Jane Addams].” 2-“It will be a busy night for the Senators.” 3-“Boss Nash and his trained legislative majority.”Box 5, Item 9
      • No caption, three panels: all three pertain to women and their inability to voteBox 5, Item 10
    • National ElectionsBox 5
      • “In his [Theodore Roosevelt's] Father's Footsteps.”Box 5, Item 1
      • • “Leap Year.” “G.O.P.,” “DEM” and “LAF” women surround “Farmer Vote.”Box 5, Item 2
      • “Mr. Wilson will have to arouse more enthusiasm then he did yesterday if [he] expects to be elected.” (1915?)Box 5, Item 3
      • “The Old Game of Drop the Handkerchief [1] as it will be played at the Republican National Convention [2] as it will be played at the Democratic National Convention.”Box 5, Item 4
      • “On the Fence.” “California,” “Minnesota,” “New Hampshire,” and “New Mexico” balance between “Republican” and “Democratic Side of the Fence” (January 10, 1916)Box 5, Item 5
      • “Our Favorite Son.” “Political boss rule” group hangs around, “Petition from the people” on ground in shreds (local politics?)Box 5, Item 6
      • No caption: McAdoo is riding a horse in a rodeo, Wilson (?) looks on with “Miss Dem.” from the “Royal Box” (presidential elections?)Box 5, Item 7
      • No caption: Wilson, T.R., Taft and others trying to please “The American Working Man”Box 5, Item 8
      • No caption: Three ideas for presidential inauguration of WilsonBox 5, Item 9
      • No caption: six scenes of the life/development of a man (Wilson?), coaching, opera, lawyer, writer, graduate, and campaigningBox 5, Item 10
      • No caption: “Voter” must choose between similar “Democratic” and “GOP Band Wagons”Box 5, Item 11
    • Miscellaneous cartoonsBox 5
      • No caption: worried/overwhelmed man at desk covered with letters with messages like “Please Donate” and “Please Aid”(1924)Box 5, Item 1
      • “What chance has a political speech against a broadcast of a sensational trial? I ask you!” (legal issues)Box 5, Item 2
      • No caption, two panels: 1-building (Mount Vernon?) with people and flag at half-mast, 2-Whitehouse with snow (December 14, 1941)Box 5, Item 3
      • No caption: fair/circus at Cedar LakeBox 5, Item 4
      • Two drawings by another artist: “Youth has been squirming out from under the thumb of authority etc.” and “Age has had its chance and failed.”Box 5, Item 5
    • Subway and Telephone IssuesBox 5
      • “Someone ought to build a subway and take the HICK out of Chicago.”Box 5, Item 1
      • “I hope our bell boy hurries with that ordinance, I'm getting nervous.” “Chicago Telephone Company” waits for “Alderman” (1916)Box 5, Item 2
      • “The message brought by the Blizzard.” (the city needs a subway, ), December 20, 1930Box 5, Item 3
      • “Suggestion for lighting the city for the next couple weeks.” “Chicago Telephone Company” and “Alderman” caught sneaking around togetherBox 5, Item 4
    • Miscellaneous Franklin Delano Roosevelt eraBox 5
      • “Our nearly two billion dollar order for arms, munitions and airplanes for allies”, June 26, 1940Box 5, Item 1
      • “Watchful Waiting Room” outside the door of “F.D.R.”Box 5, Item 2
      • “1940 Leap Year” (FDR elections), July 8, 1940Box 5, Item 3
      • “The world's spotlight is in North Africa.”, 1943Box 5, Item 4
    • Regional (State and City) PoliticsBox 5
      • “Purchasable Democratic Legislators - Cheap Grade… To the Floor of the ”House“ of Illinois Representatives.”, August 1910Box 5, Item 1
      • 1-“Mayor Dunne - ‘Well, well, here comes a political parade! I wonder if it's for me.’ 2-'Now, it's a Busse crowd.'” (Chicago politics)Box 5, Item 2
      • “The Wet bait will scare away the women and the League bait will scare away the men.” Politician “Cox” is fishingBox 5, Item 3
      • “Chicago's ‘Tammany.’ (as portrayed by Gov. Lowden)” “The Thompson Machine” magnet attracts “The Disloyal” and “The Discontented”Box 5, Item 4
      • “Humors of the Campaign. [1] The man who tried to read all the campaign posters on his way down to his office. [2] ‘It's a nice day, so I think I'll just walk down town instead of ride.’ [3] ‘Hello, let's see what some of these campaign posters have to say.’ [4] ‘Great Scott, I never knew that before!’ [5] To the night watchman- ‘Hold the light a little nearer. This is an important poster. It says that Stewart intends to expell all the Germans, Swedes and Irish from the city if he is elected, but will allow the Chinese to remain.’”Box 5, Item 5
      • “The Spring Exhibition. [1] The voters will have to act as a jury and decide between this striking painting by William Hale Thompson, and [2] this equally striking painting by Robert Sweitzer.”Box 5, Item 6
      • “Hearst—'This is just so easy.'” “Hearst” juggles “Chicago,” “San Francisco” and “New York” ballsBox 5, Item 7
      • “Tammany ‘Great Scott! What was that I swallowed?” “Tammany” tiger has eaten “Hearst”Box 5, Item 8
      • “Which ever way the wind blows, etc.” “Hearst” cloud blows on “Dunne” weathervaneBox 5, Item 9