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Tribune Company

 Organization

The Chicago Tribune is a daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, founded in 1847 by James Kelly, John E. Wheeler, and Joseph K. C. Forrest. During the 19th century, under the leadership of Joseph Medill, the paper became closely associated with Abraham Lincoln and the Republican Party. This association continued into the 20th century as Medill's grandson Colonel Robert R. McCormick assumed editorship and the paper adapted conservative isolationist and anti-New Deal viewpoints. Journalistic highs and lows during the 20th century include publishing the text of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, incorrectly calling the 1948 presidential election for Thomas Dewey instead of Harry S. Truman, and publishing a complete transcript of the Watergate tapes. The Tribune Corporation branched out into other forms of journalism with the addition of the WGN ("World's Greatest Newspaper") radio station in the 1920s and WGN TV in the 1940s, and was an early adopter of internet journalism in the mid-1990s. It remains the most-read daily newspaper in the Chicago area.

Found in 2 Collections and/or Records:

Chicago Tribune. Business manager's files: labor relations

 Collection
Identifier: XI-313
Abstract Files created by W.E. Macfarlane (Chicago Tribune business manager from 1928 until his death on 1944-10-09) and Elbert M. Antrim (business manager from 1944 to 1954)
Dates: 1930 - 1955

Chicago Tribune. Labor relations. Strike of 1947-1949 records

 Collection
Identifier: XI-310
Abstract This collection documents the 1947/1949 strike of the Chicago Typographical Union (CTU) against the Chicago Tribune Company. This collection consists of news stories clipped from the Chicago Tribune; correspondence and accounts of meetings and negotiations of the Chicago Newspaper Publishers Association (CNPA) and the unions involved (CTU, and the International Typographical Union (ITU)); contract proposals; union publications and anti-union pamphlets; and...
Dates: 1947 - 1952