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Farrell, R. Barry (Robert Barry)

 Person

Robert Barry Farrell was born in Ottawa, Canada, on September 1, 1926; he remained a Canadian citizen all his life. He obtained his B.A. (1947) in history and political science from Queen's University in Kinston, Ontario, and his M.A. (1948) and Ph. D. (1952) both in government, from Harvard University. From 1950 to 1957 Farrell taught political science at Yale University, first as an instructor and then as assistant professor.

In 1957 Farrell came to Northwestern as associate professor of political science. Ten years later he was promoted to professor, the title he held until his death. He also held several administrative positions at various times: Director of Undergraduate Studies in Political Science; Co-Director, Comparative Politics Program; and Director, Program of Research and Graduate Training in Comparative Politics. Farrell made a major contribution as founder and director of the Canadian Studies program at Northwestern.

Farrell's primary interests involved Canadian politics, especially foreign relations; comparative politics; and communist political systems. He traveled frequently making substantial tours of Eastern Europe in 1960 and 1964.

In 1969 his major book, The Making of Canadian Foreign Policy, was published in Canada. He also edited the proceedings of two important conferences: Approaches to Comparative and International Politics (1966, 1976), and Political Leadership in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union (1970).

Farrell did not marry. He died at Columbus Hospital in Chicago on November 11, 1991.

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

R. Barry Farrell (1926-1991) Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 11/3/22/10
Abstract In 1957 Farrell came to Northwestern as associate professor of political science. Ten years later he was promoted to professor, the title he held until his death in 1991. The R. Barry Farrell Papers fill sixteen boxes, spanning the period 1947-1992. Most of the material dates from 1960 to 1985. The papers are organized in six main categories: biographical materials, correspondence, teaching files, research files, trip files, and publications, with small amounts under the headings of papers...