Skip to main content Skip to search Skip to search results

Eliot, T. S. (Thomas Stearns), 1888-1965

 Person

Dates

  • Existence: 1888 - 1965

T. S. Eliot (1888–1965) American-English poet, essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic is considered to be one the twentieth century's most influential authors. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, Eliot was educated in philosophy at Harvard, the Sorbonne, and Merton College, Oxford. After settling in England, Eliot worked for a time as a schoolmaster and a bank clerk, and eventually literary editor for the publishing house Faber & Faber -of which he later became a director. In 1922 he founded and edited the exclusive literary journal the Criterion but chose to cease production in 1939 due to the onset of World War Two and paper shortages. In 1927, Eliot became a naturalized British citizen and converted the Anglican Church. Eliot’s experimental use of diction, style, and versification in works such as The Waste Land (1922) and Four Quartets (1943)  revitalized English poetry and marked him as a leading member of the Modernist Movement. The publication of Four Quartets was widely praised, and in 1948 Eliot was awarded both the Order of Merit and the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Found in 2 Collections and/or Records:

Harvey Breit Correspondence

 Collection
Identifier: MS 1
Abstract Harvey Breit, poet, playwright, and interviewer, was a reviewer for the New York Times Book Review from 1940-1965. This collection consists of more than 225 pages of correspondence sent to Breit during this period by more than fifty authors and public figures.

T. S. Eliot Correspondence Collection

 Collection
Identifier: MS2
Abstract T. S. Eliot (1888–1965) American-English poet, essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic is considered to be one the twentieth century's most influential authors.This collection consists primarily of the correspondence of T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965) to fellow authors Stephen Spender (1909 - 1995) and John Middleton Murry (1889 - 1957).