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Freeman, Arthur J.

 Person

Dates

  • Existence: 1930 - 2016

Arthur J. Freeman, 1930-2016, was born in Lublin, Poland and arrived in the United States at the age of 7. He studied physics at MIT earning his undergraduate degree and PhD, in 1952 and 1956 respectively, under the supervision of John Slater. After working at Brandeis University and the U.S. Army Materials Research Agency in Watertown, Massachusetts, Freeman returned to MIT in 1962 to join the National Magnet Laboratory (NML) as its associate director. In 1967 he became the chair of the Physics Department at Northwestern University until his retirement in 2014.

Freeman made major contributions to the field of computational physics and materials science, pioneering in the development of first-principles quantum simulation methods for complex magnetic and superconducting materials, including their structural, electronic, magnetic, optical and mechanical properties. The many awards and honors he received are a testament to the impact he made on his field. He was a Guggenheim Fellow in Physics, a Fulbright Fellow, an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, as well as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a fellow of the American Physical Society. He received the first Medal of the Materials Research Society, and the first Magnetism Award of the International Union of Pure and Applied Research. He was the founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials.

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

Arthur J. Freeman Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 11/3/21/7
Overview Arthur J. Freeman (1930-2016) was chair of the Physics Department at Northwestern University, 1967-2014. He was a solid-state theorist interested in the electronic and magnetic properties of rare-earth and other transition metals. He was well known among solid-state experimentalists for his work on hyperfine interactions in transition metals. This colleciton of his papers fills 100 boxes and span the years from 1953-2012; it contains correspondence, published and unpublished research papers,...