Skip to main content Skip to search results

Showing Collections: 1 - 5 of 5

Cyrus Colter (1910-2002) Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 11/3/1/2
Abstract The papers of Cyrus Colter (writer and educator; member of the faculty of Northwestern University's Department of African-American Studies) spans the years 1935 to 1995. It consists of biographical material, correspondence, speeches, and publications. The bulk of the collection consists of drafts of Colter's publications, especially his two last novels, A Chocolate Soldier and City of Lights.
Dates: 1935-1995

William H. Exum (1942-1986) Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 11/3/1/1
Abstract The William H. Exum Papers fill three and one-half boxes and are arranged in five subseries: biographical material, education files, correspondence, teaching files and publications files. Materials span the years 1964-1985.
Dates: 1965-1985

Leon Forrest (1937-1997) Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 11/3/1/3
Abstract Leon Richard Forrest served as chairman of Northwestern University's African American Studies department from 1985 to 1994, and also held a professorship in the English department. The Leon Forrest Papers consist of 8 boxes spanning the years 1954 to 1998. The bulk of the papers consist of manuscripts and proofs of his novels.
Dates: 1952-1998

Frederick Douglass Collection

 Collection
Identifier: MS202
Abstract Frederick Douglass (c. 1817-1895) was an abolitionist, orator, and writer. In 1838, Douglass escaped from his Maryland enslaver, and over time became one of the most celebrated abolitionists and social reformers of the 19th century. This collection of 11 original documents and 6 copies contains Frederick Douglass’ bill of sale, correspondence, newspaper clippings, and additional copies of correspondence.
Dates: 1845 - 1900

Slavery, Enslaved Persons, and Free Blacks in the Americas Collection

 Collection
Identifier: MS101
Abstract Materials in this collection of 45 documents pertain to the institution of slavery in the Americas. The documents include correspondence on the slave trade, assignments on chain gangs, bills of sale, manumission papers, and wills and bequests. They also include letters providing character references for free Black people, reports on a school in an African American religious community in Baltimore, Maryland, and an indenture agreement between a printer and an apprentice.
Dates: 1750-1895