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Navy V-12 Program (U.S.)

 Organization

The Naval V-12 program was established by the War Department on university campuses during World War II to provide the Navy with a continuous supply of officers. Northwestern's V-12 unit was formed in July, 1943. The course for pre-officer candidates who entered as freshmen consisted of four terms of sixteen weeks each. As freshmen, the students were required to take classes in math, English, physics, engineering, naval organization, physical training, and historical backgrounds of the war. After the first year, they specialized in one of five areas: engineering, deck, supply, medical or dental officers. Students obtained the equivalent of two years of college work in one and one-half years. Graduates of the program were sent to midshipman's school for 120 days, after which they were commissioned ensigns in the Naval Reserve. The program existed at Northwestern for three years, with the last trainees graduating on June 19, 1946. Overall, a total of 2,777 men completed Northwestern's V-12 program.

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

Naval V-12 Program Records

 Collection
Identifier: 0/20/1
Abstract The Naval V-12 Program was established by the War Department on university campuses during World War II to provide the Navy with a continuous supply of officers. Northwestern University's V-12 unit was formed in July, 1943. The records of the V-12 program consist of Regulation and Organization manuals, lists of faculty and their teaching loads, administrative correspondence, clippings, and various class lists and course descriptions.
Dates: 1943-1946