Northwestern

Haiman, Franklyn S. Papers Edit

Summary

Identifier
20/66

Dates

  • 1927-2003 (Creation)

Extents

  • 23.00 Boxes (Whole)

Names

Subjects

Notes

  • Abstract

    A scholar specializing in First Amendment issues, Haiman held leadership positions in academic and political organizations including the American Association of University Professors [AAUP], the Speech Association of America [SAA], the Speech Communication Association [SCA] and the American Civil Liberties Union [ACLU]. Dating from 1927 to 2003, the Franklyn S. Haiman papers comprise biographical and educational materials, correspondence, Northwestern University files, teaching materials, presentation notes and records, publications files, research notes, and records documenting Haiman's involvement in the American Association of University Professors, the Speech Communication Association, and the American Civil Liberties Union at the local, state, and national levels. The bulk of the papers dates from 1949 to 2003, with teaching materials forming the largest category of files.

  • Scope and Contents

    Dating from 1927 to 2003, the Franklyn S. Haiman papers comprise biographical and educational materials, correspondence, Northwestern University files, teaching materials, presentation notes and records, publications files, research notes, and records documenting Haiman's involvement in the American Association of University Professors, the Speech Communication Association, and the American Civil Liberties Union at the local, state, and national levels. The bulk of the papers dates from 1949 to 2003, with teaching materials forming the largest category of files. Especially interesting are the materials documenting Haiman's leadership role in ACLU activities in Chicago's North Shore communities, in Illinois, and nationally.

    The biographical materials span the years 1960 to 2003 and include curricula vitae (1976-1998); newspaper clippings pertaining to Haiman's career; faculty activity reports submitted by Haiman to Northwestern University; and clippings and announcements of the awards and honors won by Haiman. One folder contains a sketch of Haiman's family tree. (For additional biographical information, see Haiman's typescript “Memoirs of a Card-Carrying Member of the ACLU” filed in Box 19, Folder 15 of this series.)

    Dating from 1927 to 1952, the educational materials consist of official records, report cards, and course syllabi and notes that document Haiman's public school career in Cleveland Heights; undergraduate career at Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH); military service; and graduate career at Northwestern University.

    Haiman's correspondence ranges from 1949 to 2003 and is comprised of general correspondence (arranged chronologically); correspondence pertaining to Haiman's professional activities of speaking and publishing (arranged chronologically); and correspondence subject files (arranged alphabetically by subject). Extending from 1949 to 2003, the general correspondence includes incoming and outgoing letters regarding Haiman's professional relationships, teaching, research, Northwestern University business, and participation in professional organizations. Noteworthy correspondence includes Haiman's exchange with Harold Grotta, President of the Jewish fraternity Zeta Beta Tau, regarding the fraternity's membership restrictions (May 26, 1949; March 29, 1951); Haiman's criticisms of the Daily Northwestern's coverage of racial issues at Evanston Township High School (April 10, 1959); letters to and from Brenton Ver Ploeg, soldier and former student, regarding military justice in Vietnam (October 20, 1968; October 24, 1968); correspondence pertaining to Haiman's foreign research (1985-1986); exchanges with U.S. Representative Abner Mikva (1976-1977); and letters to and from Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (June 15 and 24, 1993). The professional activities correspondence highlights Haiman's speaking and publishing career from 1986 to 2003.

    Relating mainly to Haiman's teaching and scholarship, the alphabetical subject files also include letters, clippings, and official documents related to the public disturbances allegedly incited by black power leader H. Rap Brown in Cambridge, Maryland, Haiman's research in France and Japan, complimentary letters from colleagues and former students, the scholarship of Thomas Tedford and of Professor of Law and ACLU President Nadine Strossen, and the Speech Communication Association. Haiman also maintained a file containing brief notes from such prominent public figures as Chicago Mayor Richard Daley (1960), Edward R. Murrow (1961), Chief Justice Earl Warren (1973), future President John F. Kennedy (1950), then a Massachusetts senator, presidential candidates Adlai E. Stevenson (1959) and Hubert Humphrey (1959), Supreme Court Justices Hugo Black (1964) and William J. Brennan, Jr. (1983), House of Representatives Majority Leader and former student, Richard Gephardt (1994), and President Bill Clinton (1993).

    The Northwestern University files date from 1946 to 2002 and include general correspondence and alphabetically arranged subject files related to Haiman's career and committee work at the University. Subjects include Haiman's organization of an Annenberg Washington Program conference in 1990; Teaching Assistant Russell Barefield's organization of a “student power” movement in 1967; Geography Professor K. Patricia Burnett's suspension from the faculty in 1981; and Haiman's committee work for the University and the School of Speech (now School of Communication).

    The teaching files date from 1946 to 1991 and consist of grade sheets and evaluations; course materials on freedom of speech topics; communications course materials; and correspondence relating to dissertation supervision. The grade sheets date from 1946 until 1991, and the general course evaluations date from 1949 until 1991. Course materials, arranged by course number within the topical categories of “freedom of speech” and “communications” include syllabi and reading lists, examinations, and student papers. Dissertation supervision files comprise correspondence and student dissertation proposals.

    Chronologically arranged, presentations files contain publicity materials, drafts of Haiman's speeches, and correspondence relating to Haiman's speaking engagements.

    Publications files consist of general correspondence, monograph, and article categories. Dating from 1988 to 2003, the two folders of general correspondence pertain to Haiman's later publishing career. Containing publicity materials, correspondence, and a typescript of Haiman's book Group Leadership and Democratic Action, the monograph files span from 1950 to 2003 and are arranged alphabetically by publication title. Article files (1947-2003) are chronologically arranged, except for final subject files pertaining to the Haiman's 1990 article “Is Racist Speech Beyond the Pale?”; legal permissions; responses to articles; book reviews by Haiman; and plagiarism allegations by Haiman against authors Cecil Gibbs and Gordon Lippitt.

    Research notes date from 1968 to 1988 and consist of handwritten notes and data analysis from Haiman's research on the media and dissent in Japan, France, the Netherlands, and Denmark.

    Dating from 1957 to 1970, the American Association of University Professors [AAUP] files are arranged alphabetically by subject and consist of correspondence, reports, and resolutions related to AAUP activities at Northwestern University. One folder of materials pertains to an AAUP inquiry (1970) into Northwestern's non-renewal of the contract of Jack Sawyer, a controversial professor who awarded his students non-contingent grades.

    The Speech Association of America [SAA] files, also arranged alphabetically by subject, date from 1950 to 1978 and include correspondence and records related to Haiman's leadership of the Commission on Freedom of Speech; the SAA's Free Speech Newsletter; and the publication of the SAA's Free Speech Yearbook.

    Arranged alphabetically by subject, the Speech Communication Association [SCA] files range from 1970 to 1985 and document Haiman's free speech advocacy at SCA conventions and as chair of its Freedom of Speech Committee. The files include copies of the SAA's Freedom of Speech Newsletter. (Note: The Speech Association of America officially changed its named to Speech Communication Association in 1970).

    Dating from 1959 to 1995, the American Civil Liberties Union [ACLU] files provide a broad-ranging overview of both Haiman's ACLU leadership and the ACLU's local and national activities. The files comprise a memoir by Haiman; organizational records, correspondence, and minutes; and subject files that document both Haiman's ACLU leadership at local, state, and national levels, and ACLU activity in Evanston during the late 1950s, the 1960s, and 1970s. In the typescript “Memoirs of a Card-Carrying Member of the ACLU” (1994), Haiman discusses his childhood, political development, and ACLU career. The alphabetically arranged organizational records relate to the Civil Liberties Review editorial board, the ACLU's Illinois Division, the National Board of Directors, and various committees, including the North Shore Committee and National Executive Committee. A subgroup within the organizational records, the Illinois Division chairman's correspondence, is arranged chronologically from 1964 to 1975 and consists of incoming and outgoing letters related to Haiman's activities as ACLU Illinois chairman. The subject files are in alphabetical order and contain newspaper clippings and correspondence that document ACLU activity in Evanston and its neighboring suburbs. Subjects pertain to his personal support of political campaigns and platforms, including those of U.S. Representative Abner J. Mikva; controversy over the discharge of Social Science Teacher L. E. Dennis from Glenbrook High School (Northbrook, IL) in 1961; the 1958-59 investigation of racial discrimination at Evanston Township High School; book and movie censorship in Evanston; the Nazi Party's intended demonstrations in the suburb of Skokie, IL; and Northwestern University President J. Roscoe Miller's banning of a planned speech by Nazi Leader George Lincoln Rockwell on the Evanston campus in 1963.

  • Method of Acquisition

    The series was formed from Accessions #84-102, #85-158, #88-60, #91-82, #94-61, #96-69, #98-176, #99-197 and #03-212, all donated to the University Archives by Franklyn S. Haiman.

  • Conditions Governing Access

    This collection is stored off-site and requires 48 hours advance notice for retrieval. Please contact us at archives@northwestern.edu or 847-491-3136 to schedule an appointment to view the collection.

  • Separated Materials

    Five photographs were separated from the series and added to the University Archives' photographic collection. Two audio cassette recordings (dated 1980 and 1987) of Haiman's speeches and one video cassette recording (VC740), an oral history of Haiman's career, were separated from the series and added to the Archives' audiovisual collection.

  • Related Materials

    unspecified

  • Processing Information

    Rae Sikula Bielakowski; February 2004. Lori Osborne; June 2004.

  • Existence and Location of Originals

    unspecified

Components