Northwestern

Huang, Su-Shu (1915-1977) Papers Edit

Summary

Identifier
11/3/21/2

Dates

  • 1944-1980 (Creation)

Extents

  • 15.00 Boxes (Whole)

Names

Subjects

Notes

  • Abstract

    Su-Shu Huang was professor of physics and astronomy at Northwestern University. His research interests included the continuous absorption coefficient in two-electron systems; the effects of turbulence in stellar atmospheres and radiative transfer methods; rotating stars and binary stars; and the possibility of life on other planets. The Su-Shu Huang Papers fill fifteen boxes and are arranged in seven categories: biographical materials, education files, correspondence, teaching files, research files, speech manuscripts, and publications.

  • Scope and Contents

    The biographical material include curricula vitae, several bibliographies, and clippings from both scientific and lay publications. Of special interest is a set of diaries from 1955 through 1968; many of the entries here are long and detailed, and they deal with both his work and his personal life. The journal documenting his trip to China in 1974 is partly in English and partly in Chinese. Other biographical materials are also partly or wholly in Chinese. Many of the entries in English in these journals consist of reading, writing, and financial notes. Included with copies of Huang's obituaries are materials (in English or Chinese) reporting on a memorial service in Beijing, at which his sister was present, and documents related to his death. A memorial by D.E. Osterbrock (published in the Astronomy Quarterly) presents a personal portrait of Huang and has a good photograph of him as its frontispiece.

    The education files include three folders, mostly of reading and lecture notes, from his bachelor's work and ten folders of similar material from his doctoral program.

    The general correspondence consists primarily of letters relating to Huang's various publications or manuscripts in progress. There are a few personal letters, including some from his younger brother, Don, also an astronomer. Some letters are in Chinese.

    The teaching files include many manuscripts of and notes for lectures.

    The research files occupy seven boxes. This material includes notes and drafts on a variety of topics, some observational material, graphs and illustrations, computer printouts, and proposals and reports for a NASA grant.

    The speeches files contain notes for and drafts of talks, mostly before scientific groups but a few to lay groups.

    The publications files consist mainly of drafts and reprints of articles, although there are parts of three books.

  • Arrangement Note

    The Su-Shu Huang Papers are arranged in seven categories: biographical materials, education files, correspondence, teaching files, research files, speech manuscripts, and publications.

    The biographical material is arranged according to document type, with journals and diaries arranged chronologically. The education files are divided into bachelor's work and doctoral work and arranged by subject. The general correspondence is arranged chronologically. The teaching files and the research files are each arranged alphabetically by subject. The speech files and the publications files are arranged by title or topic, and reprints which have no associated manuscript materials are arranged chronologically by date of publication.

  • Method of Acquisition

    The Su-Shu Huang Papers are comprised of two accessions, nos. 79-19 and 88-253. The first was transferred from the University Archives biographical files. The second was donated by Deborah Brown of the Physics and Astronomy Department on October 25, 1988.

  • Conditions Governing Access

    None.

  • Separated Materials

    Seventeen photographs (3 in color) and a silhouette have been transferred to the University Archives photograph collection. Approximately 50 linear inches of duplicate and extraneous materials were returned to Deborah Brown.

  • Related Materials

    unspecified

  • Processing Information

    William K. Beatty, November-December, 1988.

  • Existence and Location of Originals

    unspecified

Components