Northwestern

Colegrove, Kenneth W. (1886-1975) Papers Edit

Summary

Identifier
11/3/22/4

Dates

  • 1917-1954 (Other)

Extents

  • 90.00 Boxes (Whole)

Names

Subjects

Notes

  • Abstract

    Kenneth Wallace Colegrove was a professor of political science at Northwestern University. He served as editor for the Institute of Fiscal and Political Education in New York and was a member of the editorial board of Amerasia, a review of American and Asian affairs. His research and writings centered on modern governments, politics, and law, particularly Japanese political customs, geopolitics and totalitarianism, international aviation law, and treaty making and world peace. His papers include correspondence, administrative records, research files, published works, and records of legal proceedings before which Colegrove appeared, gave testimony or was mentioned in the testimony of others.

  • Scope and Contents

    This series, a very large collection, is arranged in eight parts. They are contained in 84 boxes and are arranged according to the general, straightforward order in which Colegrove himself had organized them. Only minor changes were required where alphabetical or chronological order had been interrupted.

    Colegrove kept his records organized very carefully in alphabetical, chronological and topical order. He separated his research notes according to his major studies.

    Colegrove's correspondence generally falls between the years 1917 to 1954.

    Part I, Boxes 1-2: Biographical and personal records include a biographical file, limited family and personal correspondence, including that from relatives: Kenneth's father, and Kenneth's brother Paul; J.E. Light and J.L. Mack, whose relationship to Colegrove is not clear. This part also contains his correspondence from a mysterious German woman, Friedel Geibel. There are also family diaries, scrapbooks and miscellaneous personal items.

    Part II, Boxes 3-4: General correspondence files are organized alphabetically, by letter only, not by name of individual correspondents contained within each folder. The letters are loosely chronological within the folders.

    Part III, Boxes 5-65: This contains Colegrove's professional correspondence and administrative records. The folders are arranged alphabetically according to specific name (of individual person) or title (of organization) and chronologically wherever more than one folder appears for a given heading. This part also includes administrative records for various institutions and organizations, public addresses, articles, book reviews, public discussions, lectures, and published and unpublished manuscripts, arranged much as Colegrove left them.

    Part IV, Boxes 64-65: Although Colegrove referred to these materials as “declassified files,” he gave no explanation for the designation and an examination of the correspondence yielded no insight. This correspondence is straightforward and general in nature.

    Part V, Boxes 65-80: Colegrove's research files include manuscripts, their rough drafts, revisions, notes, and position papers. There are translations of Japanese manuscripts, and transliterations of articles from.

    Japanese newspapers and journals. The folders in these boxes contain research notes on Japan and the Far East, on the Constitution of Japan including the Minobe and Oyama drafts and transliterations, and all of Colegrove's Nippon research. The files on Nippon research cover such topics as militarism in Japan, political parties, the Imperial Diet and its documents, the economic and political situation in Japan and the Far East, and labor relations.

    Part V also includes Colegrove's research in geopolitics. The Marburg Papers, in connection with the League to Enforce Peace, contributed to Colegrove's research on world peace, international treaties, diplomacy, and the League of Nations. These research notes, which resulted in his book, The American Senate and World Peace, also include rough drafts and revisions.

    Part VI, Box 81: This contains Colegrove's shorter published works, pamphlets, booklets, articles, and reprints not listed among his major publications (see Separation Sheet for this collection). Because Colegrove published widely and kept no list of all his publications, it is impossible to be certain that everything he published, aside from his books, is contained in this part. Colegrove's pamphlets and reprints included here are the following:

    Pamphlets and Reprints

    Senator McCarthy, ca. 1950

    Teacher's Guide to Democracy versus Communism, 1958.

    “The International Aviation Policy of the United States” from The Journal of Air Law 1931 (reprint).

    “The War Lords of Japan” in the North American Review, May 1932.

    “Diplomatic Procedure Preliminary to the Congress of Westphalia” from American Journal of International Law 1919 (reprint).

    “Democracy, Communism, Fascism”: from the New World Book Encyclopedia 1949 (reprint).

    “Expansion of the Publications of the Department of State” from The American Political Science Review 1929 (reprint).

    “The German-Polish Rye Agreement” from The Journal of Political Economy 1931 (reprint).

    “The Japanese Cabinet” from The American Political Science Review 1936 (reprint).

    “The Japanese Constitution” from The American Political Science Review 1937 (reprint).

    “The Japanese Foreign Office” from The American Journal of International Law 1936 (reprint).

    “The Japanese General Election of 1928” from The American Political Science Review 1928 (reprint).

    “The Japanese Privy Council” from The American Political Science Review 1931 (reprint).

    “Labor Parties in Japan” from The American Political Science Review 1929 (reprint).

    “The New Order in East Asia” from The Far Eastern Quarterly 1941 (reprint).

    “The Role of Congress and Public Opinion in Formulating Foreign Policy” from The American Political Science Review 1944 (reprint).

    “The Treaty Making Power in Japan” from The American Journal of International Law 1931 (reprint).

    Articles in Amerasia, 4 volumes, 1937-1942.

    “Democracy: The One Sure Basis” in The World's Work 1919.

    “A New Era in World Morality” in The World's Work 1919.

    “Professors and Propaganda” in School and Society 1940.

    “Basic Issues in American Politics” with Earl DeLong from American Government 1938.

    “Another Critic” in The Saturday Review, April 1952.

    “Professor Ikuo Oyama: Japanese Scholar and Statesman in Northwestern University Alumni News 1933.

    Part VII, Boxes, 92-83: This contains records of law suits and Congressional Committee proceedings before which Colegrove appeared, gave testimony or was mentioned in testimony given by others. References to Colegrove appear in the following cases and hearings for which the University Archives has documentation:

    Court Cases

    No. 46 C1926 in the District Court of the United States for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division (1946).

    No. 30373 in the Supreme Court of Illinois (1947).

    No. 804 in the Supreme Court of the United States (1945).

    No. 1031 in the Supreme Court of the United States (1946).

    Congressional Hearings

    a. Institute of Pacific Relations: Hearings (1951-1952) before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and other Internal Security Laws of the Committee on the Judiciary: parts 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15. b. S. RES. 366 (1952).

    H. RES. 217 (1954).

    St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project S.J. RES. 27, S.J. RES. ill.

    Part VIII, Boxes 83-84: This contains business of the American Political Science Association for the period, 1937 to 1946, during which Colegrove was secretary-treasurer. This part includes audit reports and two volumes of bound minutes of the Association.

  • Arrangement Note

    General correspondence is organized alphabetically, by letter only, not by name of individual correspondents contained within each folder. The letters are loosely chronological within the folders.

    Professional correspondence is arranged alphabetically according to specific name (of individual person) or title (of organization) and chronologically wherever more than one folder appears for a given heading.

  • Method of Acquisition

    The main body of the Kenneth Colegrove Papers were donated to the University Archives by Mrs. Kenneth Colegrove on May 5, 1976 as Accession #76-7.

  • Conditions Governing Access

    None.

  • Separated Materials

    Because Colegrove collected and saved many of the sources he used for his research, his papers yielded substantial material for other departments in Northwestern's library. Many pamphlets and papers published by various agencies of the U.S. Government were given to Government Documents to dispose of as the librarians thought necessary. An interesting and useful collection of Japanese World War II propaganda booklets is now a part of the holdings of Special Collections.

    Duplicates and other extraneous materials were discarded. Publications including government documents not relating to Colegrove were transferred to the Library. Photographs were transferred to the Archives photographic collection. See also the separation sheet following the container list.

  • Related Materials

    unspecified

  • Processing Information

    Main body of the collection processed by Katherine H. Giese, February 22, 1977.

  • Existence and Location of Originals

    unspecified

Components